by denegro on 10/12/2013
We think of creative people in a heroic manner, and we celebrate them, but the thing we celebrate is the after-effect.

People don’t actually like creativity.

Source: twitter.com

by denegro on 11/11/2013

Source: twitter.com

2 notes
by denegro on 10/11/2013
The problem with hyper product-oriented entrepreneurs is that they often have one tool in their pocket: Making a great product. That’s both admirable, and dangerous. Once the initial product is working, the team has to quickly transition into marketing and user growth, which requires a different set of skills. It has to be more about metrics rather than product design: running experiments, optimizing signup flows, arbitraging LTVs and CACs, etc. It’s best when this is built on the firm foundation of user engagement that’s already been set up. In contrast, an entrepreneur that’s too product oriented will just continue polishing features or possibly introducing “big new ideas” that ultimately screw the product up. Or keep doing the same thing unaware of the milestone cliff in front of them. Scary.

Andrew Chen - When a great product hits the funding crunch

3 notes
by denegro on 08/10/2013
There’s no right or wrong way to do this job — it’s just a matter of: You get as many smart people around you as possible in the writers room, and I was very lucky to have that.

‘Breaking Bad’: Creator Vince Gilligan explains series finale | EW.com

2 notes
by denegro on 15/9/2013

carmelhassan:

Data looks better naked  - via @yusef

carmelhassan:

Data looks better naked  - via @yusef

Source: carmelhassan

7 notes
by denegro on 06/9/2013
7) How much equity should you give a partner? Divide things up into these categories: manage the company; raise the money; had the idea; brings in the revenues; built the product (or performs the services). Divide up in equal portions.

The Ultimate Cheat Sheet For Starting And Running Your Business | TechCrunch

1 note
by denegro on 28/8/2013

Juanjo Sáez — Hoy he decidido esto

Juanjo Sáez — Hoy he decidido esto

1 note
by denegro on 28/8/2013

BILL WATTERSON: A cartoonist’s advice

BILL WATTERSON: A cartoonist’s advice

by denegro on 15/8/2013

3 notes
by denegro on 09/8/2013
There are two reasons founders resist going out and recruiting users individually. One is a combination of shyness and laziness. They’d rather sit at home writing code than go out and talk to a bunch of strangers and probably be rejected by most of them. But for a startup to succeed, at least one founder (usually the CEO) will have to spend a lot of time on sales and marketing.

Paul Graham — Do things that don’t scale